Australian Bulldogs



Welcome


• Article 3 - What is the Difference Between The Australian Bulldog and The British Bulldog? A comparison.

This is one of our most frequently asked questions regarding the breed. What are the major differences between the Aussie Bulldog and the British Bulldog?
We are going to attempt to answer this in this article, however we are certain that other breeders and lovers of the breed will have varying opinions, which they can feel free to also share with everyone. We believe the major differences can be summed up as those relating to:
* Health
* Conformation
* Stamina and overall ability
* Watch/guard dog ability
* Cost of living (associated with vet bills)
* Affordability (last we looked registered British Bulldogs are between $2500-$3000, Aussie’s are generally more in the range of $500-$1500 depending on quality). Funny that-British breeders say they are so expensive because their hard to breed- Aussie’s are just as hard to breed, not for beginners!
* Australian Bulldogs are not recognised by the Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC), therefore you cannot show them as you would a British Bulldog. Being relatives of the British Bulldog, with many Aussie’s being immediate (first generation) offspring of British Bulldogs, including some of our own dogs, Oden and Zelda. The Aussie Bulldogs will no doubt share many of the traits associated with British Bulldogs but to varying extents, depending on how British Bulldoggy your Aussie is- we’ll discuss this later.

Similarities between the Aussie Bulldog and the British Bulldog

* The requirement for a high level of human intervention for successful whelping/rearing puppies
* Sensitivity to high temperature, depending on the extent of flattened face (British Bulldog trait)
* Predominantly white puppies are prone to skin cancers, as with any breed.
* Aussie’s possibly require more food- they tend to be more active and slightly larger. A picture really shows the overall conformational difference between an Aussie and a British Bulldog. When asked the main differenc between the Australian and the British Bulldog, we generally say overall the Aussie is less exaggerated in its features, but must still retain a square and in proportion style of head and body. British Bulldogs tend to have exaggerated short legs, wrinkles, short face, bowing front legs, broad shoulders and very narrow pelvic space. All of which pose problems, not only those that are obvious like breathing problems but can lead to a myriad of issues outlined in our blog on genetic disorders associated with bulldogs.

The British Bulldog: Note the shorter face (harder to breathe with), excessive wrinkles (bacteria love to grow in these moist places, causing dermatitis and infections), the stumpy legs (prone to luxating patella, hip dysplasia etc).

British Bulldog
British Bulldog

The Aussie Bulldog: Note the adequate (yet square) length of muzzle allowing for unimpeded breathing, longer length of leg (a more athletic animal, prone to less skeletal disorders), no excessive wrinkling. The Aussie really is a picture of a more athletic and versatile animal, suited to the Australia environment.

Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog


The trials and Tribulations of Breeding Aussie Bulldogs From our experience with the breed they are very similar in their inability to thrive as parents. All of our matings are carried out via Artificial insemination and very often our girls have caesars, not only because they may have trouble whelping but because we usually have more than 6 puppies in a litter and its much less stressful for the mother if we do a caesarian. This does limit our girls to a maximum of around 3 or 4 litters if we’re lucky, but we wouldn’t expect anymore from our girls anyway retiring them at this point. Our help is also needed to rear the puppies, when they’re born we don’t leave them with their mums, as they are very clumsy and will squash them if let alone. So if you thought having a baby yourself was tough, try feeding, wiping, changing and burping 8 possibly 13 babies every 3 hours! Yes every 3 hours, including 3am. Breeding Bulldogs is not for the light hearted or the inexperienced. We love our Bulldogs and cherish every moment with our babies, but it can be very trying at times, especially when your juggling it with work, study and other family committments, we wouldn’t have it any other way. We know our vet and have been going there for over 20 years, caesars cost us at least $600 all going smoothly. Then you have artificial insemination costs, pathology tests, feeding puppies (only the best quality foods), microchipping and vaccination (approx. $60 per puppy), worming (intestinal and heart worm), flea treatments (pack of frontline 6 months worth $70). The list of costs goes on, breeders really don’t come out on top, you do it for the love of the breed, to improve the breed and why mate the dogs if you don’t intend to keep a puppy yourself??

How do Aussie’s compare with the British Bulldogs in the Heat? We will again use photos here to show the differing extents of impairment in breathing, which is directly related to the length of the muzzle. The 1st 2 photos show the British Bulldog head, a vert short snout, squashed in, resulting in a equally squashed respiratory system. These dogs are not suited to the Aussie climate. The 3rd picture shows the old style British Buldog, a much more functional dog, then we have on of our Aussie’s Zelda sired by a British Bulldog and very much like one herself, yet similar to the old style British. Zelda doesn’t cope well in the heat, but her progeny to Oden seem to have more length in the muzzle. See Matilda, Zelda’s daughter as an example. Then we have pictured Zephyr, a good example of the breed, being the result of many generations of Aussie to Aussie breeding no use of the British Bulldog, she is a real athelete, yet still has an impressive square head and the laid back personality of the British Bulldog. Then pictured is an American Bulldog, but many aussie’s are tending toward this style of dog, and are not good examples of the breed. Breeders with such dogs will tend to breed them with British Bulldogs in an attempt to improve upon their females faults, only to find that they will not get quality puppies as a result. British Bulldogs sires cannot perform miracles, infact no stud can, but for the benefit of the breed only females and males that conform to the breed standard should be bred from.

Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog
Aussie Bulldog

Aussie Bulldogs are great watch dogs and make fair guard dogs? Well our Aussie’s are very protective of their premises and should an unsuspecting thief cross their path in their yard they won’t hang around for long. Aussie’s will bark when something is not right, however I have never had the experience of observing them as guard dogs, fending off their or their owners belongings. If anyone has any stories of heroic Aussie Bulldogs please do share them with us, I’m sure there are many. Any other differences/similarities? Please share them with us, or if you have any questions you’d like to share on this topic.





© Aussie Bulldogs